Curated News: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)

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Newswise: Musical rhythms shown to improve language processing in children with Developmental Language Disorder
Released: 12-Jul-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Musical rhythms shown to improve language processing in children with Developmental Language Disorder
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Musical rhythms can help children with speech and language processing difficulties in finding their voice by improving their capacity to repeat sentences they just heard, according to a study led by a Western Sydney University researcher and co-authored by Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

   
Released: 10-Jul-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Scientists discover natural repair process that fixes damaged hearing cells
University of Virginia Health System

University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers have discovered how the cells that let us hear can repair themselves after being damaged. That important insight could benefit efforts to develop new and better ways to treat and prevent hearing loss.

Newswise: Monell Center Receives Funding for First-of-its-Kind Conference to Establish Universal Chemosensory Testing
Released: 3-Apr-2023 10:05 AM EDT
Monell Center Receives Funding for First-of-its-Kind Conference to Establish Universal Chemosensory Testing
Monell Chemical Senses Center

The Monell Chemical Senses Center, with colleagues from Massachusetts General Hospital, The Ohio State University, and University of Florida, has received funding from the NIH Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to organize a visionary conference titled, “Towards Universal Chemosensory Testing.” The overarching goal is to involve multiple stakeholders to develop strategies for implementing routine chemosensory testing - smell, taste, and related senses - across the lifespan as a part of US healthcare.

Not for public release

This news release is embargoed until 20-Mar-2023 12:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 17-Mar-2023 4:20 PM EDT

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Released: 24-Jan-2023 7:30 PM EST
Researchers identify neurons that "learn" to smell a threat
University of Rochester Medical Center

Whether conscious of it or not, when entering a new space, we use our sense of smell to assess whether it is safe or a threat. In fact, for much of the animal kingdom, this ability is necessary for survival and reproduction.

Newswise: Food for thought: Early Nutrition Shapes the Brain and Influences What We Like to Eat
10-Jan-2023 10:05 AM EST
Food for thought: Early Nutrition Shapes the Brain and Influences What We Like to Eat
Stony Brook University

A new study by Stony Brook University researchers showed there is indeed a strong relationship between what we eat early in life and food preferences in adults. This relationship depends the effects of our early experience with food has on the brain. The work is published in Science Advances.

Released: 22-Nov-2022 11:10 AM EST
NIH-Funded Study Uses AI to Improve Language for Children with Cochlear Implants
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

A new multicenter study will use artificial intelligence (AI) to analyze pre-surgical brain MRI scans to predict individual-level language outcomes in English- and Spanish-learning children up to four years after cochlear implantation. The long-term goal of the research is to customize therapy to maximize children’s hearing and language ability after receiving a cochlear implant.

   
Newswise: NIH Funds Miller School Researcher's Novel Work to Develop Gene Therapy for Hearing Loss-related Usher Syndrome
Released: 22-Sep-2022 2:30 PM EDT
NIH Funds Miller School Researcher's Novel Work to Develop Gene Therapy for Hearing Loss-related Usher Syndrome
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) has awarded Xue Zhong Liu, M.D., Ph.D., Marian and Walter Hotchkiss Endowed Chair in Otolaryngology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, a five-year, $3.5 million R01 research grant to develop a precision medicine approach to treat hearing loss (HL) in Usher syndrome (USH).

Newswise: Distinct Differences Exist Between Sense of Smell Distortions Associated With COVID-19
Released: 13-Dec-2021 4:05 PM EST
Distinct Differences Exist Between Sense of Smell Distortions Associated With COVID-19
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Knowing the distinct patterns of demographics, medical history, and quality-of-life issues associated with the smell distortion disorders parosmia and phantosmia may provide insight into the organization and function of the olfactory system, as well as help physicians better treat their patients.

Newswise: Retinoid Therapy May Improve Vision in People with Rare Genetic Disorder, According to Study in Mice from University of Maryland School of Medicine and NIH
Released: 9-Nov-2021 12:25 PM EST
Retinoid Therapy May Improve Vision in People with Rare Genetic Disorder, According to Study in Mice from University of Maryland School of Medicine and NIH
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Using data generated from patients and mice with genetic mutation for the disorder Usher syndrome, researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health documented the natural history of vision impairment in patients and identified the cell mechanism behind progressive vision loss.

Newswise: Mapping the Mouse Brain, and by Extension, the Human Brain Too
4-Oct-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Mapping the Mouse Brain, and by Extension, the Human Brain Too
UC San Diego Health

In a special issue of Nature, UC San Diego researchers further refine the organization of cells within key regions of the mouse brain and the organization of transcriptomic, epigenomic and regulatory factors that provide these brain cells with function and purpose.

Newswise: Mass General Brigham Laryngology Researcher Awarded $11.9 Million NIH Grant to Lead New Multi-Institutional Center for Neurological Voice Disorders
27-Sep-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Mass General Brigham Laryngology Researcher Awarded $11.9 Million NIH Grant to Lead New Multi-Institutional Center for Neurological Voice Disorders
Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Laryngology researcher Kristina Simonyan, MD, PhD, Dr med, of Mass Eye and Ear, has been awarded an $11.9 million P50 Clinical Research Center Grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicable Disorders to form a new multidisciplinary center across four academic medical institutions that will be committed to conducting research on laryngeal dystonia and voice tremor, two debilitating neurological voice disorders.

Released: 17-Aug-2021 8:55 AM EDT
University of Miami Health System One of Three Sites Nationally to Test Potentially 'Revolutionary' Cochlear Implant
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine will be one of only three sites in the nation to test a potentially revolutionary opto-electrical cochlear implant, which could improve quality of life for millions with hearing loss.

Released: 19-Jul-2021 3:15 PM EDT
New High-Tech Portal Launched to Speed Hearing Loss Innovations
University of Maryland Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) launched a new online tool that could more quickly advance medical discoveries to reverse progressive hearing loss. The tool enables easy access to genetic and other molecular data from hundreds of technical research studies involving hearing function and the ear.

22-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Recycling of the Eye’s Light Sensors Is Faulty in Progressive Blindness of Older Adults
University of Maryland School of Medicine

With the National Eye Institute reporting that about 11 million older adults in the U.S. endure a condition that leads to progressive blindness, known as age-related macular degeneration, University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers are starting to understand what goes wrong in the disease, in order to develop new therapies to treat it.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Tug-of-War Receptors Controlling Sour Taste Detection in Fruit Flies Sheds Light on Human Taste Biology
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Monell researchers found that flies use two distinct types of gustatory (taste) receptor neurons (GRNs), which are analogous to taste receptor cells in mammals, to discriminate slightly from highly sour foods. One group of GRNs are maximally activated by low acidity, while the other group responds to high acidity.

10-May-2021 3:20 PM EDT
No Lasting Benefit to Tubes Over Antibiotics for Childhood Ear Infections, Trial Shows
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

There is no long-term benefit to surgically placing tubes in a young child’s ears to reduce recurrent ear infections, compared with giving oral antibiotics, a randomized trial determined.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Decoding smell
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Since the beginning of the pandemic, a loss of smell has emerged as one of the telltale signs of COVID-19.

Released: 24-Feb-2021 9:15 AM EST
New NIH Grant Supports Innovative Approach to Cochlear Implant Surgery
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine was awarded a new five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) for “Application of Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia for Hearing Conservation During Cochlear Implant Surgeries.” It follows a pilot grant from the CTSI, a small business innovation grant from the National Institutes of Health, and industry funding to Dr. Suhrud Rajguru, Ph.D., associate professor at the Miller School of Medicine in biomedical engineering and otolaryngology, and his laboratory.

Released: 11-Feb-2021 9:30 AM EST
Implant Improves Balance, Movement and Quality of Life for People with Inner Ear Disorder
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Getting around without the need to concentrate on every step is something most of us can take for granted because our inner ears drive reflexes that make maintaining balance automatic. However, for about 1.8 million adults worldwide with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) — loss of the inner ears’ sense of balance — walking requires constant attention to avoid a fall. Now, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have shown that they can facilitate walking, relieve dizziness and improve quality of life in patients with BVH by surgically implanting a stimulator that electrically bypasses malfunctioning areas of the inner ear and partially restores the sensation of balance.



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