Curated News: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

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Newswise: Researchers Discover Genetic Locations for Increased Risk of Hidradenitis Suppurativa
Released: 26-Jul-2023 3:05 PM EDT
Researchers Discover Genetic Locations for Increased Risk of Hidradenitis Suppurativa
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory follicular disease which causes painful lumps to form under the skin. The lumps typically form in areas where skin rubs together – such as the armpits, groin, and under the breasts. HS can range in severity from occasional fluid-filled abscesses to widespread rope-like scarring, chronic pain, and increase of infection.

Released: 3-Apr-2023 8:50 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Awarded Prestigious $1.3 Million Grant to Expand Research Training Program in Skin Biology
Mount Sinai Health System

The Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Department of Dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai will expand its research training program in skin biology with support from a five-year, $1.3 million T32 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS).

Released: 16-Mar-2023 7:25 PM EDT
An extra X chromosome-linked gene may explain decreased viral infection severity in females
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers may have found why viral infections hit males more severely than females. They found that female mouse and human NK cells have an extra copy of an X chromosome-linked gene called UTX. UTX acts as an epigenetic regulator to boost NK cell anti-viral function, while repressing NK cell numbers.

   
Released: 9-Mar-2023 2:55 PM EST
Researchers uncover new cell types involved in osteoarthritis
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A Michigan Medicine study has identified a new potential target for treating osteoarthritis – a debilitating joint disease that affects over 31 million Americans and is a leading cause of disability worldwide.

Released: 8-Mar-2023 12:40 PM EST
New Study: Abatacept Therapy Offers Promising Results Treating Juvenile Dermatomyositis
George Washington University

Juvenile dermatomyositis, a rare but often severe and chronic systemic autoimmune disease, includes a large number of patients who are treatment resistant, requiring long term immunosuppressive therapy. A small open-label study published in Arthritis and Rheumatology shows promise using a targeted biologic therapy called abatacept to treat such patients.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:50 AM EST
Study Finds Lower Risk of Severe Infection and Hospitalization with Belimumab Compared to Oral Immunosuppressants
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, found that the biologic B-cell inhibitor belimumab was associated with a lower risk of severe infections and hospitalizations compared to nonbiologic immunosuppressants.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:20 AM EST
Holding Mycophenolate Mofetil for 10 Days or More May Improve COVID-19 Vaccine Response
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, demonstrated that withholding mycophenolate mofetil for 10 days significantly increased antibody response after 2 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, without a significant increase in flares.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:05 AM EST
Study Finds AAV Characteristics and Treatments Vary Across Lifespan
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, demonstrated an association between age of diagnosis and clinical characteristics and treatments in Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis patients.

Newswise: Novel Study Identifies Key Molecular Players in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Released: 24-Oct-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Novel Study Identifies Key Molecular Players in Rheumatoid Arthritis
University of California San Diego

Using a novel systems biology approach, scientists at UC San Diego School of Medicine have further parsed the cellular players and roles involved in rheumatoid arthritis, a complex disease that affects more than one million Americans in ways that have defied development of uniform treatments.

Newswise: Scientists ID pathway that triggers mice to scratch when they see others do the same
Released: 4-Oct-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Scientists ID pathway that triggers mice to scratch when they see others do the same
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a pathway in the brains of mice that is activated when the animals see other mice scratching, but that pathway does not run through the visual cortex.

Newswise: New UCI-Led Study Reveals Characteristics of Stable Vitiligo Skin Disease
Released: 6-Jun-2022 4:05 PM EDT
New UCI-Led Study Reveals Characteristics of Stable Vitiligo Skin Disease
University of California, Irvine

A new study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine, reveals the unique cell-to-cell communication networks that can perpetuate inflammation and prevent repigmentation in patients with vitiligo disease.

Newswise: Neural Pathway Key to Sensation of Pleasant Touch Identified
27-Apr-2022 5:30 PM EDT
Neural Pathway Key to Sensation of Pleasant Touch Identified
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers from the Washington University Center for the Study of Itch and Sensory Disorders have identified a specific neuropeptide and a neural circuit that transmit pleasant touch from the skin to the brain. The findings eventually may help scientists better understand and treat disorders characterized by touch avoidance and impaired social development.

17-Mar-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Piezo1 Possible Key to Supporting Muscle Regeneration in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Tracing the impact of a single protein, Piezo1, Penn researchers found that restoring it in muscles affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy could improve their ability to heal efficiently

13-Jan-2022 5:00 AM EST
Origin of Rare Disease FOP Rooted in Muscle Regeneration Dysfunction
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A mutation in the gene that causes fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) doesn’t just cause extra bone growth but is tied to a problem in generating new muscle tissue after injury

Released: 20-Oct-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Awarded Prestigious $4 Million Grant to Launch Skin Biology and Diseases Resource-based Center
Mount Sinai Health System

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is establishing a Skin Biology and Diseases Resource-based Center (SBDRC), funded by a $4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS).

1-Sep-2021 8:20 AM EDT
Drug Cocktail Reduces Aging-Associated Disc Degeneration
Thomas Jefferson University

Therapies that target aging cells early pave the way to easing back pain

31-Aug-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Rheumatoid arthritis treated with implanted cells that release drug
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have genetically engineered cells that, when implanted in mice, deliver a biologic drug in response to inflammation.

Released: 25-Aug-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Penn Center for Musculoskeletal Disorders NIH Grant Renewed for $4 Million
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The United States’ longest-running NIH-sponsored musculoskeletal research center will receive $4M to continue its studies of everything from ligament tears to osteoarthritis

Released: 7-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
‘Fortunate Accident’ May Yield Immunity Weapon Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In what turned out to be one of the most important accidents of all time, Scottish bacteriologist Alexander Fleming returned to his laboratory after a vacation in 1928 to find a clear zone surrounding a piece of mold that had infiltrated a petri dish full of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a common skin bacterium he was growing.

14-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
What makes us sneeze?
Washington University in St. Louis

What exactly triggers a sneeze? A team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified, in mice, specific cells and proteins that control the sneeze reflex. Better understanding of what causes us to sneeze — specifically how neurons behave in response to allergens and viruses — may point to treatments capable of slowing the spread of infectious respiratory diseases.



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