Feature Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology

Filters close
Newswise: ghoneim-eman-researchers-uncover-buried-branch-of-nile-river-news-notpad-eman-ghoneim.jpg
Released: 19-Jul-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Research Team Discovers Lost Nile River Branch
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Findings may explain location of largest Egyptian pyramid field

Released: 17-Jul-2024 9:05 PM EDT
International experts descend on Adelaide to examine how ‘vernacular’ architectural insight can solve some of our biggest global challenges
University of South Australia

Internationally renowned architectural scholars will descend upon Adelaide, South Australia, for a conference exploring the varied nature of modern vernacular studies and its insight for 21st century problems.

Newswise: Insight into one of life’s earliest ancestors revealed in new study
10-Jul-2024 5:05 AM EDT
Insight into one of life’s earliest ancestors revealed in new study
University of Bristol

An international team of researchers led by the University of Bristol has shed light on Earth’s earliest ecosystem, showing that within a few hundred million years of planetary formation, life on Earth was already flourishing.

Newswise: Archaeologists report earliest evidence for plant farming in east Africa
9-Jul-2024 4:05 AM EDT
Archaeologists report earliest evidence for plant farming in east Africa
Washington University in St. Louis

A trove of ancient plant remains excavated in Kenya helps explain the history of plant farming in equatorial eastern Africa, a region long thought to be important for early farming but where scant evidence from actual physical crops has been previously uncovered.

Newswise: New study adds to mystery of Cahokia exodus
Released: 3-Jul-2024 3:05 AM EDT
New study adds to mystery of Cahokia exodus
Washington University in St. Louis

WashU archaeologists dig into Cahokia's history to cast doubt on a popular theory about why the ancient city was abandoned.

Newswise: First case of Down syndrome in Neandertals documented in new study
Released: 27-Jun-2024 2:05 PM EDT
First case of Down syndrome in Neandertals documented in new study
Binghamton University, State University of New York

A new study published by an international multidisciplinary team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, documents the first case of Down syndrome in Neandertals and reveals that they were capable of providing altruistic care and support for a vulnerable member of their social group.

Newswise:Video Embedded prehistoric-pompeii-discovered-most-pristine-trilobite-fossils-ever-found-shake-up-scientific-understanding-of-the-long-extinct-group
VIDEO
26-Jun-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Prehistoric Pompeii discovered: Most pristine trilobite fossils ever found shake up scientific understanding of the long extinct group
University of Bristol

Researchers have described some of the best-preserved three-dimensional trilobite fossils ever discovered. The fossils, which are more than 500 million years old, were collected in the High Atlas of Morocco and are being referred to by scientists as “Pompeii” trilobites due to their remarkable preservation in ash.

Released: 26-Jun-2024 11:05 AM EDT
The sound of conch-shell trumpets may have linked ancient Pueblo communities
Binghamton University, State University of New York

In medieval Europe, villages were bound together by the sound of church bells, which summoned the community for reasons both sacred and secular. Desert communities in northwestern New Mexico may have been similarly organized around sound — in this case, the blast of a conch-shell trumpet echoing out from the central great house.

Newswise: Researchers From UNH and Northeastern Dig into History to Uncover a “King”
Released: 25-Jun-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Researchers From UNH and Northeastern Dig into History to Uncover a “King”
University of New Hampshire

Archaeologists at the University of New Hampshire along with a historian at Northeastern University believe they have unearthed the long-lost homestead of King Pompey, an enslaved African who won his freedom and later became one of the first Black property owners in colonial New England.

Newswise:Video Embedded loki-s-horned-dinosaur-wielded-a-pair-of-giant-blades
VIDEO
Released: 24-Jun-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Loki’s horned dinosaur wielded a pair of giant blades
University of Utah

The Natural History Museum of Utah announced Lokiceratops rangiformis, the largest and most ornate horned dino ever found. Its distinctive horn pattern inspired its name, "Loki’s horned face that looks like a caribou."

Newswise: Researchers at the University of Tromsø develop novel AI algorithm for analyzing microfossils
Released: 24-Jun-2024 5:05 AM EDT
Researchers at the University of Tromsø develop novel AI algorithm for analyzing microfossils
Chinese Academy of Sciences

Researchers have developed a method for detecting and analysing microfossils automatically from microscope images using AI. Microfossil analysis is important both for industry and research to gain an understanding of the subsurface, and to understand the past geological time period and the past climate.

Newswise:Video Embedded embargoed-easter-island-agriculture-qa
VIDEO
Released: 21-Jun-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Easter Island Expert Q&A: Video and Transcript Available
Newswise

Join this virtual Q&A with Carl P. Lipo, PhD, Binghamton University, to discuss the upcoming embargoed paper about Easter Island agricultural and anthropology research.

   
Newswise:Video Embedded easter-island-s-population-crash-never-occurred-new-research-reveals
VIDEO
16-Jun-2024 9:00 PM EDT
Easter Island’s ‘population crash’ never occurred, new research reveals
Binghamton University, State University of New York

A detailed new analysis of Easter Island’s rock gardens by a research team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York shows that a hypothetical “population crash” never occurred on the island.

Newswise: New study finds dinosaur fossils did not inspire the mythological griffin
Released: 21-Jun-2024 4:05 AM EDT
New study finds dinosaur fossils did not inspire the mythological griffin
University of Portsmouth

For centuries, scientists thought they knew where the griffin legend came from. A new study takes a closer look at the data and folklore’s influence on science.

Newswise: Tulane University’s Middle American Research Institute receives grant for mapping of Maya civilization
Released: 15-Apr-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Tulane University’s Middle American Research Institute receives grant for mapping of Maya civilization
Tulane University

The Middle American Research Institute (MARI) in Tulane University’s School of Liberal Arts has received a $1.5 million grant from the Hitz Foundation to conduct innovative archaeological research on the Maya civilization of Mexico and Central America.

Newswise: DNA Reveals What 6th Century Emperor Wu Looked Like
Released: 1-Apr-2024 7:05 PM EDT
DNA Reveals What 6th Century Emperor Wu Looked Like
Newswise Review

A team of researchers used DNA to reconstruct the appearance of Chinese Emperor Wu of Northern Zhou, who lived 1,500 years ago.

Newswise: Movement of crops, animals played a key role in domestication
Released: 28-Mar-2024 5:05 PM EDT
Movement of crops, animals played a key role in domestication
Washington University in St. Louis

Over the last 15 years, archaeologists have challenged outdated ideas about humans controlling nature. Writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Xinyi Liu in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis argues for a new conceptual bridge connecting the science of biological domestication to early food globalization.

Newswise: excavating-evidence-of-early-agricultural-engineering-news-notpad-our.jpg
Released: 26-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
UNCW Researchers Excavating Evidence of Early Agricultural Engineering
University of North Carolina Wilmington

UNC Wilmington environmental sciences assistant professor Joni “Osku“ Backstrom and Mark Wilde-Ramsing, underwater archaeologist and former director of the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology, have traversed the lower Cape Fear and Brunswick rivers searching for archaeological evidence of the rice fields once situated along the rivers’ banks.

Newswise: Plant seed and fruit analysis from the biblical home of Goliath sheds unprecedented light on Philistine ritual practices
Released: 26-Feb-2024 2:05 AM EST
Plant seed and fruit analysis from the biblical home of Goliath sheds unprecedented light on Philistine ritual practices
Bar-Ilan University

While many aspects of Philistine culture are well-documented, the specifics of Philistine religious practices and deities have long remained shrouded in mystery. The study by Frumin et al. on "Plant-Related Philistine Ritual Practices at Biblical Gath," recently published in Scientific Reports by researchers at Bar-Ilan University, contributes valuable new data to our understanding of the Philistine's ritual practices. The discovery of numerous plants in two temples unearthed at the site unraveled unprecedented insights into Philistine cultic rituals and beliefs – their temple food ingredients, timing of ceremonies, and plants for temple decoration.

Newswise: Artifact could be linked to Spanish explorer Coronado's expedition across Texas Panhandle
Released: 23-Feb-2024 8:00 AM EST
Artifact could be linked to Spanish explorer Coronado's expedition across Texas Panhandle
Southern Methodist University

It’s a small piece of obsidian, just over 5 centimeters long, likely found on a hard-scrabble piece of ranchland in the Texas panhandle. But when SMU anthropologist Matthew Boulanger looks at it, he gets a mental image of Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado making his way across the plains more than 470 years ago in search of a fabled city of gold.



close
2.32824